October 27, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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Digital Scholarship Seminar: Findr: Speed-Dating for Digital Research Collaborations

Findr: Speed-Dating for Digital Research Collaborations5187729003_2048e595b4_m

Wednesday 7 December 2016, 12-2pm

Informatics Forum (room TBC)

 

 


Humanities and social science researchers with treasure troves of data, and computer scientists looking for compelling research questions to address computationally: it’s a meeting of minds with significant potential for interesting joint projects. But finding the perfect match can be extremely difficult, especially for early-career researchers who have not yet had the chance to build extensive professional networks.

This event seeks to address this problem using a speed-dating format, to enable researchers with complementary interests and research problems to find each other efficiently and identify whether a collaboration is feasible. It is aimed especially at MSc students in the School of Informatics who are seeking a dissertation topic, and at humanities researchers who have ideas for digital projects but who need help with the data analysis and other computational aspects. Participants from all levels across Informatics and CAHSS are welcome, however, including students who are interested in paid RA work, and those who do not necessarily have a project in mind but would just like to come and get some ideas while listening to others scope out potential collaborators.

Participants will need to fill out a brief profile, describing their research interests and expertise, and will then be matched with one or more potential collaborators, and given time to speak together, as well as to other attendees. There will be follow-on resources available, including the chance to apply for seed funding for potential projects.

Date: Wednesday 7 December 2016
Time: 12-2pm
Venue: Informatics Forum (room TBC)

Lunch will be provided, and booking is essential. To reserve a place, email Helen Bradley & Emma Cockburn at digitalscholarship@ed.ac.uk with your name, department/school, and a paragraph outlining why you are interested in attending the event by 25 November 2016.

Organisers:

Richard Mayr (Informatics), Anouk Lang (LLC) and Helen Bradley & Emma Cockburn (CAHSS Digital Scholarship)

November 22, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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Getting Started with Regular Expressions

Date: Wednesday December 14 2016seminars-6

Time: 14.00-17.00

Place: Computer Lab 1.02, 50 George Square

Bring: Your own laptop

 


How can I quickly find and highlight all the relevant phrases in this long document?

How can I extract the addresses form this huge collection of correspondence?

How can I mark up all the stage directions from this volume of plays?

How can I correct this recurrent OCR mistake across all my files?

The answer to all these questions is regular expressions or regex. Regular expressions are useful in many ways as they allow us to automate repetitive and time-consuming tasks such as renaming files, searching for specific words, using ‘find and replace’ to edit, or cutting and pasting information into other files. They can also help with more complex tasks like extracting specific information from a set of documents, or marking up aspects of a text collection.

This beginner’s workshop will introduce you to regular expressions, show you how they are structured and developed, and give you the opportunity to have a go at constructing your own scripts. We’ll show you both how they can be created within familiar work processing programmes, and how you can use the programming language Python to develop more complex regex.

At the end of this workshop, there will be an opportunity to discuss and get advice about your own ideas and projects.

This workshop is the first of two session: it is pitched as an introduction for complete beginners and assumes no prior knowledge of regular expressions or Python. The second workshop, planned for spring 2017, will go into more depth on use of Python and explore the development of more complex regular expressions.

Book online here.

November 22, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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Collecting and Coding Qualitative Social Media Data with Dedoose

Date: Tuesday 6 Decemberseminars-6

Time: 14.00 – 17.00

Place: uCreate Studio, 1.12 Main Library

Bring: Your own laptop

 


Social media offers lots of exciting opportunities to analyse information and opinions shared among large groups of people, but it also raises a number of practical and ethical issues: How can researchers acquire and manipulate such data sets? How should they store them? What special measures should be taken when working with personal data?

This workshop introduces participants to issues involved in scraping, modifying and coding social media data.  Using the ongoing project ‘Live Pulse’ as a case study, it will introduce a mixed methods research approach to collecting and analysing social media data from Yik Yak, Jodel, Facebook and Twitter. Considerations around anonymising and storing this data will be highlighted before moving on to a practical introduction to using and coding qualitative social media data with the online Dedoose tool. Participants will be provided with resources that will allow them to trial and assess Dedoose for potential use in their own work.

All staff and postgraduates are welcome; the workshop is designed for those new to working with social media and Dedoose.

Book online here.

November 17, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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Working with Twitter Data: An Introduction for Beginners

seminars-6

Date: Friday 25 November 2017

Time: 12.00-13.30

Place: Lab 1.02, 50 George Square

 

 


This workshop is aimed at humanities researchers and postgraduate students who are interested in capturing and analysing Twitter data for their research, but have no experience in obtaining data of this type from an API. In this workshop, we will look at the kinds of data the Twitter API makes available, and participants will be walked through the process of obtaining developer credentials so as to be able to download tweets and their associated metadata for themselves. We will also consider the ethics of using social media data in research, think about data management basics, and end with some examples of the kinds of projects and visualisations it is possible to do with this kind of data.

Please note that this workshop assumes no prior knowledge of Twitter. If you are already using Twitter data for your research, this session will cover ground that you are likely to already be familiar with.

To register for a place, please email digitalscholarship@ed.ac.uk with your name, department, and one or two sentences describing why you want to attend this workshop and what, if anything, you’ve done with Twitter data already.

November 16, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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Using Online Historical Maps for Research


seminars-6Date: Thursday 24 November 2016

Time: 14.00 – 17.00

Place: uCreate Studio, 1.12 Main Library

Bring: Your own laptop

 


Maps are used by researchers in many different fields and more and more map collections are being digitised and made available online.  Contemporary mapping technologies afford lots of new opportunities to work with maps, but using historical maps often means working without geolocation data and GIS. This workshop will explore the potential of historical maps for research, the issues and challenges that historic maps present, and how you can make the most out of the mapping resources that the University of Edinburgh provides access to. A practical session, it will focus on the Digimap historic mapping service – which allows you to select, view, annotate and print/download historical Ordnance Survey maps from Landmark Information Group for use in graphics, GIS or CAD software – to address research questions.

At the end of this workshop, there will be an opportunity to discuss and get advice about your own ideas and projects.

This workshop is for beginners and no prior knowledge of mapping is assumed.

Book online here.

November 16, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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A Digitisation Masterclass: The Scottish Session Papers

Date: Tuesday November 29 2016seminars-6

Time: 09.30-12.30

Place: CRC Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Main library

Bring: Your own laptop

 


 

Digitised material forms the foundation of many digital scholarship projects, and the impact of decisions taken during the digitisation process can have far reaching consequences for research.

Led by staff in the CRC this masterclass takes participants through the process of digitising historical documents from the original printed or hand written page to a clean, mark-up ready text file. It takes as its focus the Scottish Session Papers, an archive of legal documents in various formats dating back to the 1740s. The Session Papers not only give a fascinating insight into 18th and 19th century social conditions, they also provide a useful case study of the complexities of digitising historical documents.

Participants will learn how selection decisions are taken, the kinds of challenges different materials can present, how documents are prepared and photographed, how and why document metadata is modelled and created, and how OCR software is used to produce text files from images. A hands-on session, it introduces a variety of relevant software packages, including ABBYY and Transkribus and explored the impact of different decision on the collections usability. The Scottish Session Paper provides a fascinating and complex case study on which this workshop will focus.

Book online here.

October 27, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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Digital Scholarship Seminar: Digital Lifehacks for the Busy Academic

seminar-bubble-muted-purple-1Digital Lifehacks for the Busy Academic (or, Reclaiming Your Time for More Interesting Things)

Come along to hear four academics talk about the digital hacks, tips and tricks they use to save time with research, teaching, admin and life in general. The format will be lightning talks with quick demos: we want to get through a lot in the space of an hour. There will be refreshments, and the chance to find out about further digital research training opportunities.

No technical knowledge is required, though participants are welcome to bring a laptop to try things out as we go along.


Speakers:

Dr Jeremy Knox (Digital Education)
Dr Anouk Lang (English Literature)
Dr Lisa Otty (EDINA)
Dr Aaron Pelttari (Classics)

Date: Wednesday 16 November 2016
Time: 1-2pm
Venue: Room 1.12, 1st floor, Main Library

Refreshments will be provided. No booking is required, but for catering purposes please RSVP to Helen Bradley & Emma Cockburn at digitalscholarship@ed.ac.uk.

October 27, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
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Spectral Imaging and Material History:  A Digital Archive of David Livingstone’s Exploration of Africa

Original item held by National Library of Scotland.

1 to 2.30pm, Monday 14 November 2016

6th Floor Research Suite, Centre for Research Collections, Main Library


We have an exciting opportunity to hear directly from the Livingstone Spectral Imaging Project  who are visiting Edinburgh to share insights into this international digital humanities collaboration to apply advanced imaging technology to the study of the manuscript of Victorian Explorer David Livingstone.This talk would be of interest to nineteenth-century scholars in literature, history, divinity, history of science, anthropology; librarians and archivists; history of the book scholars; postcolonial scholars; digital humanists;  and anyone interested in using digital technologies to address historical or cultural questions.

Previously featured in a National Geographic documentary, the project has now concluded its second phase of research (2013-16) and members of the team including scholars and scientists will present on the results. The first phase (2010-13) confirmed that spectral imaging could be applied to recover faded, illegible text in some of David Livingstone’s most damaged texts. In the new phase, the team takes the technology in a new direction: to study the material history of Livingstone’s 1870 Field Diary in order to understand its passage across space, time, and different hands. This talk will discuss the image processing techniques applied to the diary, how those techniques have helped recovered the lost material history of the diary, and the implications of this work for digital archives more broadly.

The presentation will include an exploration of the primary interventions the project is making into the digital humanities and postcolonial studies; an overview of the multispectral image processes used to examine three main research areas: inks, staining, and folds and impressions; and a Q&A session with some key members of the project team.

The international team:   

Dr. Adrian S. Wisnicki is an assistant professor of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a faculty fellow of the university’s Center for Digital Research in the Humanities. His research focuses on the digital humanities, Victorian studies, and African studies. He directs Livingstone Online and the Livingstone Spectral Imaging Project and has received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the British Academy, and the Modern Humanities Research Association.

Dr. Megan Ward is an assistant professor of English at Oregon State University and Associate Director of Livingstone Online. She specializes in digital archives, material histories, technology studies, and Victorian realism, and is completing a book project titled Human Reproductions: Victorian Realist Character and Artificial Intelligence. She co-directs both Livingstone Online and the Livingstone Spectral Imaging Project.

Dr. Roger Easton has been on the faculty of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science of the Rochester Institute of Technology since 1986, where he teaches courses in imaging mathematics and optics. Since the mid 1990s, his research interests have focused on imaging tools for historical objects, primarily manuscripts. He was head of the imaging team for the Archimedes Palimpsest project and been a member of the teams for the David Livingstone Diaries, the Martellus World Map, and the palimpsests at St. Catherine’s Monastery.

Dr. Keith Knox is an imaging scientist with the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library (EMEL). He has 40 years experience in conducting research in scanning, printing and astronomical image processing. Keith retired in 2015 to focus his efforts on the imaging and recovery of cultural heritage information from historical documents and artifacts.

Register for this free event here.

Contact Helen Bradley and Emma Cockburn at digitalscholarship@ed.ac.uk with any queries.

October 13, 2016
by Emma Cockburn
0 comments

Workshop: Getting Started with Zotero

digital-libraryGetting started with Zotero

Wednesday 26 October 2016, 3.30-5pm

Computer lab 1.01, 50 George Square


 

Zotero is a free, user-friendly tool for managing bibliographic references designed by scholars for scholars. It can import citations from library catalogues, databases and regular webpages with a single click. It is easily searchable and comes with a free Word plugin that allows you to insert individual references and bibliographies into Word documents, automatically formatted in the bibliographic style of your choice. Zotero also enables you to share your citation libraries with other users, which is useful for collaborative projects, and to access your references through a web interface when you are away from your own machine. If you already use reference management software (eg. EndNote), you may still find it useful to know how to use Zotero, especially if you are likely to lose institutional access to EndNote at some point (for example if you are a PG student who will eventually graduate and who doesn’t want to pay the hefty EndNote licence fee).

All staff and postgraduates are welcome, the workshop  is designed for those who have never used Zotero before.

Date: Wednesday 26 October 2016
Time: 3.30-5pm
Place: Computer lab 1.01, 50 George Square
Bring: Your own laptop, if desired (though those without laptops can use lab PCs)
Sign up at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/workshop-getting-started-with-zotero-wed-26-oct-2016-330-5pm-tickets-28540578639

October 6, 2016
by Helen Bradley
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Digital Scholarship Seminar: TEI

The Researcher’s Workflow – from Word to TEIseminar-bubble-muted-purple-1

New digital technologies and markup tools have provided humanities researchers with exciting opportunities for engaging with texts in a variety of new ways.

This seminar will give an introduction to TEI markup – the scholarly standard for XML markup, widely used for digital scholarly editions – and will demonstrate how completed TEI documents can be transformed and displayed.


Speakers:

Dr Roxana Preda (LLC) is working on a project of great magnitude: a digital edition of Ezra Pound’s The Cantos, a poem in 116 sections. The platform is now operational and is developing into a major reference for the annotated text, sources and secondary literature on the poem.

David Oulton (CAHSS Web Team) is a Senior Web Content Officer and is interested in using combinations of emerging technology – including geo-mapping, dynamic data and immersive panoramas – to find fresh ways of bringing research and information to the public.

Details:

Date: Thursday 20 October 2016
Time: 1pm-2pm
Venue: Room 1.12, 1st floor, Main Library
Participants should bring their own laptops to work on, as no PCs are available, and install a free trial version of oXygen from here prior to the seminar. A list of relevant materials can be found here.

Refreshments will be provided. No booking is required, but for catering purposes please RSVP to Helen Bradley & Emma Cockburn at digitalscholarship@ed.ac.uk